Saturday, October 13, 2007

Pink Ribbon Hat

In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, I've created this lovely cap with six cabled pink ribbons, separated by mini cables that work their way all the way up to the crown and join in the center. This hat could easily be made in a different color to support various causes: red for AIDS/HIV, yellow for the troops, a variegated rainbow yarn for gay rights, your choice! Here's a list of awareness ribbon colors and their meanings to help you along.

Queue this on Ravelry!

Materials:
200yds (183m) of worsted weight yarn in the color of your choice
US #7/4.5mm 16in (41cm) circular needle
Set of US #7/4.5mm double-pointed needles
One stitch marker
Tapestry needle

Gauge:
20sts by 28rows = 4in (10cm) in stst

Finished Size:
Adult Small (Large) = 21 (23)in [53 (58)cm] in circumference

Click here for Abbreviations

Special Abbreviations:
FC3 = slip next 2 sts onto cable needle, hold in front, purl next st, knit sts from cable needle
BC3 = slip next st onto cable needle, hold in back, knit next 2 sts, purl st from cable needle
m1Lp = make 1 left purlwise - insert left needle from front to back under bar between next 2 sts, and purl this new stitch through the back loop
m1Rp = make 1 right purlwise - insert left needle from back to front under bar between next 2 sts, and purl this new stitch

Pattern:
CO 96 (108) sts on circ. Join to work in the round, being careful not to twist.
Rnds 1, 5, 8: [k2, p14 (16)] 6 times.
Rnds 2, 4, 6: knit.
Rnds 3, 7: [FC2, p14 (16)] 6 times.
Rnds 9-32 can be worked by inserting chart between mini cables (don't forget to twist the mini cables every four rnds) or from the written instructions below.
Rnds 9, 10: [k2, p1 (2), k2, p8, k2, p1 (2)] 6 times.
Rnd 11: [FC2, p1 (2), FC3, p6, BC3, p1 (2)] 6 times.
Rnd 12: [k2, p2 (3), k2, p6, k2, p2 (3)] 6 times.
Rnd 13: [k2, p2 (3), FC3, p4, BC3, p2 (3)] 6 times.
Rnd 14: [k2, p3 (4), k2, p4, k2, p3 (4)] 6 times.
Rnd 15: [FC2, p3 (4), FC3, p2, BC3, p3 (4)] 6 times.
Rnd 16: [k2, p4 (5), k2, p2, k2, p4 (5)] 6 times.
Rnd 17: [k2, p4 (5), FC3, BC3, p4 (5)] 6 times.
Rnd 18: [k2, p5 (6), k4, p5 (6)] 6 times.
Rnd 19: [FC2, p5 (6), FC4, p5 (6)] 6 times.
Rnd 20: [k2, p5 (6), k4, p5 (6)] 6 times.
Rnd 21: [k2, p4 (5), BC3, FC3, p4 (5)] 6 times.
Rnd 22: [k2, p4 (5), k2, p2, k2, p4 (5)] 6 times.
Rnd 23: [FC2, p3 (4), BC3, p2, FC3, p3 (4)] 6 times.
Rnds 24, 25, 26: [k2, p3 (4), k2, p4, k2, p3 (4)] 6 times.
Rnd 27: [FC2, p3 (4), FC3, p2, BC3, p3 (4)] 6 times.
Rnd 28: [k2, p4 (5), k2, p2, k2, p4 (5)] 6 times.
Rnd 29: [k2, p4 (5), FC3, BC3, p4 (5)] 6 times.
Rnd 30: [k2, p5 (6), k4, p5 (6)] 6 times.
Rnd 31: [FC2, p5 (6), m1Rp, ssk, k2tog, m1Lp, p5 (6)] 6 times.
Rnd 32: [k2, p6 (7), k2tog, m1Lp, p6 (7)] 6 times.




Small Size Only:
Rnd 33: [k2, p14] 5 times, k2, p7, pm to mark new beg of rnds.

Large Size Only:
Rnd 33: [k2, p16] 6 times.
Rnd 34: [k2, p16] 6 times.
Rnd 35: [FC2, p16] 5 times, FC2, p8, pm to mark new beg of rnds.

Crown Shaping:
Switch to dpns.
Rnd 1: [p6 (7), k2tog, k1, p7 (8)] 6 times - 90 (102) sts.
Rnd 2: [p6 (7), FC2 (k2), p7 (8)] 6 times.
Rnd 3: [p6 (7), k1, ssk, p6 (7)] 6 times - 84 (96) sts.
Rnd 4: [p6 (7), k2 (FC2), p6 (7)] 6 times.
Rnd 5: [p5 (6), k2tog, k1, p6 (7)] 6 times - 78 (90) sts.
Rnd 6: [p5 (6), FC2 (k2), p6 (7)] 6 times.
Rnd 7: [p5 (6), k1, ssk, p5 (6)] 6 times - 72 (84) sts.
Rnd 8: [p5 (6), k2 (FC2), p5 (6)] 6 times.
Rnd 9: [p4 (5), k2tog, k1, p5 (6)] 6 times - 66 (78) sts.
Rnd 10: [p4 (5), FC2 (k2), p5 (6)] 6 times.
Rnd 11: [p4 (5), k1, ssk, p4 (5)] 6 times - 60 (72) sts.
Rnd 12: [p4 (5), k2 (FC2), p4 (5)] 6 times.

Large Size Only:
Rnd 13: [p4, k2tog, k1, p5] 6 times - 66 sts.
Rnd 14: [p4, k2, p5] 6 times.
Rnd 15: [p4, k1, ssk, p4] 6 times - 60 sts.
Rnd 16: [p4, FC2, p4] 6 times.

Both Sizes:
Rnd 13 (17): [p3, k2tog, ssk, p3] 6 times - 48 sts.
Rnd 14 (18): [p3, FC2 (k2), p3] 6 times.
Rnd 15 (19): [p2, k2tog, ssk, p2] 6 times - 36 sts.
Rnd 16 (20): [p2, k2 (FC2), p2] 6 times.
Rnd 17 (21): [p1, k2tog, ssk, p1] 6 times - 24 sts.
Rnd 18 (22): [p1, FC2 (k2), p1] 6 times.
Rnd 19 (23): [k2tog, ssk] 6 times - 12 sts.
Rnd 20 (24): ssk 6 times - 6 sts.
Cut yarn and thread through rem loops using tapestry needle. Pull tight and tie off. Weave in ends.

Feel free to comment here with questions.

This pattern is intended for personal use only. Please do not try to sell it or any product made from it. Thank you.

75 comments:

  1. Very nice work! Just saw your pattern on Ravelry. Got my invitation yesterday & it's quite exciting. I think I may knit one of your cable ribbon hats for my Mom, who's had b.cancer. Thanks very much for sharing!

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  2. Thanks! And welcome to Ravelry!

    Good luck with the hat. Hope your mom likes it. Let me know if you find any typos.

    You're very welcome!

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  3. this is awesome!

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  4. ABSOLUTELY AMAZING!!!!!!

    My anniversary for Breast Cancer was Monday the 22nd. SEVEN YEARS FREE!!

    That is such a beautiful hat! I would never take it off my head ever!!!


    I'm going to print your pattern and hopefully my girlfriend will have time to teach me how to make cables! I make hats for cancer patients, survivors, and anyone who needs a hat!

    Thank-you for sharing your wonderful talent!

    iSherry

    Raverly: icrocheticreate

    www.iknit-icrochet-iyarn.net

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  5. Thanks!

    Congratulations on your cancerlessness. That's always something to celebrate, anniversary or not.

    Cables aren't difficult at all. It's just rearranging the stitches before you knit them.

    Good luck! And be sure to post pictures on Ravelry if you make one - I'd love to see it.

    Carissa
    Ravelry: nosmallfeet

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  6. I'll just say "wow..."

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  7. Aha! Blogging under another name huh? I didn't realize you designed! Brava on the beautiful hat!

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  8. Thanks, but, uh, do I know you?

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  9. The hat is just beautiful. I am going to knit it in green, my son has a liver transplant, and you just don't find things for that. Thank you so much for sharing the pattern.

    She

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  10. Thanks. I'm glad you like it and can adapt it for your cause. I'd love to see the finished product when you're done.

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  11. D=< And just when I was looking for something to knit for Breast cancer week, I find THIS! I'm so mad, and I'm hopping up and down o n my toes. I would have LOVED to have worn this on b.cancer day. =) Anyways, it's really lovely. ~Sekaya fifteenyearoldcrazyknitter.

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  12. Glad you like it, but sorry it didn't find you in time. There's always next year.

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  13. I love! Love! Love this pattern. How wonderful! I am a beginner knitter, do you think this is too hard to attempt? Do I have to have graph reading knowledg? Thanks for sharing!

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  14. Thanks! Glad you like it.

    You'll need to know how to knit, purl, work in the round on a circular needle and double-pointed needles, increase, decrease and work cables. You can work the cables from the chart if you want, but I've also written out those rounds individually if you prefer that.

    If you have any trouble, do let me know and I'll help however I can. If I can't explain something in words, I can hopefully link you to helpful websites with pictures and videos.

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  15. What is the difference between FC3, FC4, FC2, FC5? Thanks - can't wait to get started.

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  16. For the even numbers, FC2 and FC4, click here for my common abbreviations. In these cases, the two or four stitches (respectively) involved in the twist are all knit stitches. You will slip half of them to a cable needle, hold it in front of your work, knit the other half of the stitches, then knit the ones from the cable needle.

    The abbreviations that are only used in this pattern, like FC3, are listed at the beginning under "Special Abbreviations". With FC3, only two of the stitches are knits and one is a purl stitch. You'll slip the two knit stitches to the cable needle, hold it in front, purl the next stitch, then knit the two from the cable needle. Similarly, with BC3, you'll slip the one purl stitch to the cable needle, hold it in back, knit the next two stitches, then purl the one from the cable needle.

    There is no FC5, unless I made a typo somewhere, in which case, let me know where and I'll fix it.

    Hope that helps.

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  17. Hello. I'm enjoying knitting the pink ribbon hat, but, I just can't figure out how to make the m1Lp and m1Rp stitches. I'm assuming the "next 2 sts" are stitches on the right needle, but maybe that's incorrect. But then I don't know how to purl that stitch. Thanks for any help you can give me!!

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  18. By "next 2 sts", I mean the st you just worked that's now on the right needle and the first st on the left needle. You'll pick up the bar between them by poking under it with your left needle (from the front for a m1Lp and from the back for a m1Rp), then you'll purl this new st (through the back loop for a m1Lp and through the front loop for a m1Rp). Knittinghelp.com has videos for this if you are a visual learner. Scroll down on this page to M1R and M1L, and at the bottom of each of those paragraphs are videos for how to do them purlwise.

    Hope that helps.

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  19. Thanks SO much for the explanation, and for posting it so quickly!! I also was helped by the video - wht a great website! Thanks again!
    Carol

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  20. Love this pattern, but I'm a crocheter and can't knit. Any possibility of a similar pattern for us who crochet? Thanks for sharing this beautiful cap. Holly

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  21. I'm a begining knitter, also a Brest Cancer survivor. I'm attempting this as a challenge.
    Rnd 11-23 start of with [FC2, what does the [ mean?

    Thanks,

    Nancy

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  22. Nancy, the things inside [] are to be repeated 6 times to complete each round. The things in () are for the larger size. If you're making the smaller size, ignore them; if you're making the larger size, you'll work what's in the () instead of the instruction just before the ().

    Let me know if you have any other questions.

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  23. What does the FC2 mean?

    Thanks,

    Nancy

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  24. FC2 means slip next st onto cable needle, hold in front, knit next st, knit st from cable needle.

    For future reference, all of my abbreviations are here.

    Hope that helps.

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  25. Does FC4 mean to slip two stitches onto the cable needle, hold in front, than knit the next two stitches, than knit the stitiches on the cable needle?

    Thanks

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  26. I'm a beginning knitter. I can't visualize how to do the M1lp and M1LR.
    I'm on row 32 and don't want to make a mistake at this stage of the game.

    Also the chart and written insturctions don't seem to match. Guess it's because I'm a beginner and don't know how to read it?

    Thanks,

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  27. Here are some videos that might help you. If you scroll down to M1R and M1L, follow the videos for how to do it on the purl side.

    You're right; the written instructions don't completely match the chart. The chart only shows the ribbon cable, not the min cables in between.

    Let me know if you have any other questions.

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  28. Where are the viedos?

    Thanks

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  29. That's weird. My link didn't show up. Sorry, here they are.

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  30. I can't wait to make one of these for one of the girls in my depression/anxiety group. Thanks so much for linking to the list of ribbon meanings. I appreciate the pattern. Check me out on ravelry (knittergoddss) next month and I'll post pictures of my finished product with a link to your pattern.

    knittergoddss@hotmail.com

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  31. i am so excited to find this pattern! i've been looking for something like this literally for MONTHS!!! my best friend is recovering from her breast CA surgery. she would be tickled pink to have one of these. thanks so much!

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  32. This is so pretty... my mom is always finding patterns for things to make with pink ribbons in them, so I am secretly making this for her for Christmas. Hopefully she doesn't run across this pattern before I'm done!

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  33. would you be able to adapt the hat pattern to an afghan (or lapghan) pattern? I would love to make this for my aunt (cancer survivor) but I think she would like a small afghan over the hat. Not sure how to change from hat pattern....is there a multiple of "x" stitches to get the pattern?

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  34. Sure, you could just cast on a multiple of 12 plus 2 stitches, but any border stitches you want (like a garter stitch border to prevent curling). Then just follow the chart for however many repeats to get the size afghan you want. Keep in mind that the chart and written instructions are for working in the round, so you'd have to reverse even rounds (knit the purls and purl the knits) for the back side of the afghan. The chart also doesn't include the 2-stitch mini cable between the pink ribbons. Good luck!

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  35. Just thought I would share with you, I've made several hats using your pattern, they're all donated to the cancer clinic. It's a lovely pattern, thanks for posting it. Blessings

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  36. This is a beautiful pattern, thank you so much for sharing it! I see that you suggested it could be changed for an afghan. I'd love to make this for a breast cancer survivor friend in a larger gauge yarn. Can the pattern be adjusted for that? For instance for a 16 stitch = 4" gauge? Thank you!

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  37. Sure, you could. I'd probably just do five sections instead of six. You may also want to start the crown shaping earlier, so the hat doesn't come out too long.

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  38. Thank you, I'll try that larger gauge yarn with 5 sections. I know my friend will seriously love this hat, thank you again it is SO pretty!

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  39. I found your beautiful pattern on Ravelry. Gorgeous! I am currently training/fundraising for the Susan G. Korman Breast Cancer 3-day walk. I would like to sell your hat as a method of fundraising, 100% of the proceeds would go towards breast cancer research. Would you grant permission for that?

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  40. Absolutely! I hope it raises lots of dough. And thanks for asking for permission first. Good luck! Let me know if you have any questions about the pattern.

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  41. This hat is beautiful. I have been looking for a ribbon pattern that incorporated cables. Would it be okay if I make up some hats and sell as a fundraiser? I am participating in the Susan G. Komen 3-Day as well and holding a big design a bra contest in October. Was hoping to have some nice hand made things to sell as well? And for Minnesota in October I think a hat would be great.
    Thanks,
    Grace

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  42. Absolutely! I hope you raise lots of money for the cause! Let me know if you have any questions about the pattern.

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  43. do you think this would work if I tried to make the ribbons a different shade of pink then the rest of the hat?!
    it's an awesome hat~

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  44. It is certainly possible, though perhaps a bit tedious. Here a couple beautiful examples:

    Chuck's Cabled Socks

    Elinor's Mittens

    Kriya Yoga Mat Bag (ravelry link)

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  45. Do you think you could modify it for those who are "knitting in the round inept"? I would love to do this hat but I can only manage to knit on straight needles...

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  46. Jenn, sorry for the delayed reply. Life got in the way.

    You could absolutely do this pattern flat and seam it up. I would cast on two extra stitches, one on each end, to be the seam stitches later. Then you work odd-numbered rows the as written, but reverse knits and purls on the even-numbered rows. For example,
    Rnd 12: [k2, p2(3), k2, p6, k2, p2(3)] 6 times.
    would become
    Row 12: [p2, k2(3), p2, k6, p2, k2(3)] 6 times.
    The only row that would involve more than simple knitting and purling would be
    Rnd 32: [k2, p6(7), k2tog, m1Lp, p6(7)] 6 times.
    which would become
    Row 32: [p2, k6(7), p2tog, m1L, k6(7)] 6 times.

    And since the main body of the hat ends with an odd row, the Crown Shaping will be the opposite - all even-numbered rows will stay the same, while knits and purls are interchanged on the odd rows.

    Hope that all makes sense. Let me know if you have any more questions.

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  47. Perfect! Thank you so much!

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  48. I just found your pattern for the pink ribbon hat. I would like to knit one. I had cancer of the uterus and my coworker had breast cancer. I am writing this out to use with straight needles when I got to row 33 it says small size only but how about rows 34,35,36 and the crown shaping after row 12 it has large size only then under it both sizes which one do I use to make the small size.

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  49. For the small size, there is no row 34 or 35. If it says "large size only", just ignore it and skip to the next section. Same for the second part of the crown shaping. You'll go straight from row 12 of the crown shaping to the "both sizes" section, and pretend the large size stuff isn't even there.

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  50. I just finished knitting your beautiful hat in size small. The picture shows a FC2 cross at the top of the hat, but rows 13 through 20 of the crown directions don't include a FC2. My last 8 rows look like K2's. Did I do something wrong? Thank you.

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  51. No, you didn't do anything wrong. You're absolutely correct! I have edited the pattern to add the cable twists to the final crown shaping. Thanks for pointing that out!

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  52. Hi Carissa,
    I love this pattern. I have a friend that recently lost her mom to cancer. I would love to make this hat for her in memory of her mom. However I am unable to print out the whole pattern. It will give me the first page then the rest comes out blank. Can you help me??

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  53. Laurie, I'm not sure what the problem is. The easiest solution I can suggest is to copy and paste into a text document and print from there. Hope that helps!

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  54. I Love your hat, was wondering if you have a crochet pattern.

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  55. No, sorry, I don't know crochet well enough to create patterns in that form. You may want to try Ravelry, if you haven't already.

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  56. Thank you for sharing.

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  57. Thank you for sharing.

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  58. Would you be able to create a pattern for a headband with the pink ribbon around it like the hat? I plan on making them for all our members of Walkathon for Breast Cancer month? I plan on making the hat for the survivors which is beautiful and headband for the supporters. Maybe in two colors? pink and white.

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  59. You could easily stick my ribbon cable chart into a simple headband pattern, like this one or this one. If nothing else, you could just work my chart a few times, long enough to wrap around your head, then sew the ends together. Hope that helps!

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  60. Thank you for this! My 14 year old cousin just found out last week that she has leukemia. We are going to do a hat party to make her some stuff and this will be a perfect pattern for some hats.

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  61. I am making my second pink hat - thank you for this lovely pattern, it's been a wonderful way to help support my friends who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.

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  62. Thanks a lot for this so lovely pattern. I will try to do it for TPOR (tricotons pour octobre rose), a french initiative for breast cancer awareness month. Kisses from France.

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  63. Thank you so for this pattern. You said NOT to sell the hat. Would you mind if I made some for charity and they sold them to raise money? Please let me know.
    my e mail is jallard55@comcast.net Thank you again.
    Judy

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    Replies
    1. Absolutely! Charity fundraising is totally acceptable. I just don't want anyone trying to start a business and profit off my ideas. Thanks for understanding, and thanks for asking in advance! Let me know if you have any questions about the pattern.

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  64. Hi Carissa, I've just started to lose my hair & found your pattern. I'm making it for myself, however, I'm not sure what the FC2 is.... You have explanations for FC3 etc, but none for the FC2... Can you help me out please! Thank you

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    Replies
    1. No problem, Janet! To work the FC2, you will slip 1 st onto a cable needle, hold it in front of your work, knit next st, then knit the st from the cable needle. For future reference, all my frequently-used abbreviations are here.

      Please let me know if you have any more questions!

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  65. I'm on my third one of these. It's my third friend to get breast cancer-I knit with prayers of healing for the recipient. I love this pattern, but I wish I didn't have the occasion to make it.

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    Replies
    1. I totally understand, but I'm glad you like the pattern.

      Delete
  66. Clarissa, My friends who have survived and lost to breast cancer has reached 20. I would like to make your hat and sell to my colleagues and donate to the Susan B Komen Foundation in my friends honor/memory if ok with you. Beverly Siegrist

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    Replies
    1. Yes, that's fine, Beverly. Thank you for asking in advance. Please let me know if you have any questions about the pattern.

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  67. I need some help - I'm stuck on "Rnd 33: [k2, p14] 5 times, k2, p7, pm to mark new beg of rnds.". I'm making the small size and I have it marked off with stitch markers so each section with a ribbon is marked and they are each 16 inches. K2, P14 5 times comes up right but it says the last section you only k2 p7, which is 9 stitches. That leaves me 7 extra stitches. Maybe I'm reading it wrong - what does "pm to mark new beg of rnds" mean?

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    Replies
    1. "pm" means "Place Marker". So this means you'll still a little stitch marker ring (or a safety pin, or a scrap of yarn tied in a knot, or whatever you like) after those last 9 stitches to mark where the *new* beginning of your rounds will be. That means those final 7 stitches that haven't been worked yet will now become the *first* 7 stitches of the next round.

      Let me know if that is still unclear, or if you have any other questions.

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