Sunday, March 12, 2017

Don't Sweat It

As an inherently lazy person, I have been loving the recent "athleisure" style. Any fashion trend that makes it socially acceptable to wear sweatshirts in public is alright by me! This thrifted grey 4XL sweatshirt, however, was simply beyond my tolerance for frump. So comfy though!

Sweatshirt Refit - Before

My first step was to pick out the top-stitching around the bottom band and cuffs, and then the pick out the serging as well to separate the ribbing from the body.

Sweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In Progress

Once the edges were un-cinched, I was able to flatten out the body and use my self-drafted tunic pattern to cut the new shape.

Sweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In Progress

There was enough fabric left over at each shoulder that was the perfect size for pockets!

Sweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In Progress

Next, I used my tunic sleeve pattern to cut the top edge of the sleeves down the size, then cut a straight taper down to the cuff.

Sweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In Progress

I pinned each pocket piece to the side edges and serged them together.

Sweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In Progress

Then I pinned and serged each sleeve to body.

Sweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In Progress

The side seams were then serged all the way from the cuff, down the side, around the pocket, and down to the bottom edge. To finish off the pockets a little more, I flipped them right-side-out and top-stitched the front edge with my regular sewing machine.

Sweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In Progress

Then it was time to reattach the bottom band and cuffs. Since I had cut down the width of the shirt, the original length of the bottom band would no longer cause as much puckering around the hips - exactly as I wanted! I pinned each pocket lining in place along the bottom edge, then I pinned and serged the ribbing back on, being sure to snag the bottom edge of the pockets on the inside as I went. This will keep the linings in place so they won't hang down below the bottom band and be visible from the outside.

Sweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In Progress

Rinse and repeat for cuffs, and I was finished!

Sweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In ProgressSweatshirt Refit - In Progress

Sweatshirt Refit - After
Sweatshirt Refit - AfterSweatshirt Refit - After
Sweatshirt Refit - After

Sweatshirt Refit - Before & After

I loved it so much, I did it again to another thrifted sweatshirt!

Sweatshirt Refit - Before

This one was a little longer and not quite so wide as the first. The sleeves were set in further than the dark grey one, so I didn't have enough extra fabric at the shoulders for the pockets. However, since the sleeves were so long, I decided to sacrifice some of that length and cut the pockets from the top of each sleeves.

Sweatshirt Refit - After
Sweatshirt Refit - AfterSweatshirt Refit - After
Sweatshirt Refit - After

Sweatshirt Refit - Before & After

4 comments:

  1. Great job! My complaint about sweatshirts is the frumpy, sloppy looking shoulders, you solved that problem beautifully. Now if I could just draft a pattern and do the same for myself. Thanks for the inspiration!

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    1. I feel the same way! I don't know why they're made so boxy and unflattering. Bringing in the shoulders helps so much though! If you don't trust your pattern drafting skills, you can always use an existing shirt that fits well to draw out your pattern.

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  2. Carissa ! -- so happy to once again to be able to study your refashioning steps to the final photo. I, too, love the way the sweatshirt fits at the shoulders and down through the bust area.

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    1. Thanks, Linda! The flared tunic has really become a favorite shape of mine recently.

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